Aromatic Blends

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Whalehead King
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Fri Nov 23, 2018 6:35 pm

Some people love 'em, some people hate 'em. Most people don't agree on what the term means.

I like some, I love some. I like most, depending on what we are talking about. The ones that other people think are aros and that I don't, I don't like so much.

All pipe tobacco has an aroma but are all pipe tobaccos aromatic?

What's the definition of an aromatic blend? I tend to fall into the added topping camp, but there are some who disagree and I fully understand their arguments in favor of the designation. I agree with them. Aromatic is a slippery designation. I'm looking at a tin of Plumcake as I write this.
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Fr_Tom
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Fri Nov 23, 2018 7:02 pm

If it is topping forward I call it an aro. I would not consider MacB's Plumcake an aro, but TR thinks it is.
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houtenziel
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Fri Nov 23, 2018 8:21 pm

Perhaps my interpretation is to literal, but: "Having an aroma; fragrant or sweet-smelling"

I call anything an Aromatic that has an aroma that is noticeably enhanced beyond straight tobacco. There are some heavily topped blends where the tobacco flavor is totally subliminated that still smell like I am smoking a Marb.. Those I wouldn't consider an aromatic at all(they don't smell good). There are some very lightly topped blends, where the topping doesn't come through in the flavor much but is very prominent in the room note.. that is an Aro to me. There are gradations of this in both directions, but I tend to stick to the definition of the word and not the industry.
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9 Iron
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Sat Nov 24, 2018 8:49 am

The term Aromatic is an overused, muddied descriptor, generally applied, to the degree that it doesn’t really help to describe anymore. Kind of like the term Sports Car, which is used when talking about a Ferrari or a Toyota Corrola. There are Danish aromatics with their honey cased cavendish, softened-up English crossover latakia blends with added sugary cavendish, the stout Lakeland flowery and herbal blends that smell like grandmas unmentionables but pack a whallop (kinda like grandma), and the American Aromatic blends of steamed and cased burley and virginia with chocolate and vanilla smells.

Speaking of which, I’m smoking some Sutliff Chocolate Truffle at the moment, a blend I consider to be a rare “Tastes as good as it smells aromatic” that is also grandma approved, and we don’t have to get into any kind of Freudian grandma issues when it’s lit up.
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Sat Nov 24, 2018 10:40 am

What would we call the perfume aeros? Tried a couple of those and grandmas undies would be a better smoke.
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Whalehead King
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Sat Nov 24, 2018 4:46 pm

Hitzy wrote:
Sat Nov 24, 2018 10:40 am
What would we call the perfume aeros? Tried a couple of those and grandmas undies would be a better smoke.
Those aren't aros. They are called Lakeland blends. Just to confuse you. ;)
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Whalehead King
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Sat Nov 24, 2018 4:50 pm

houtenziel wrote:
Fri Nov 23, 2018 8:21 pm
Perhaps my interpretation is to literal, but: "Having an aroma; fragrant or sweet-smelling"

I call anything an Aromatic that has an aroma that is noticeably enhanced beyond straight tobacco. There are some heavily topped blends where the tobacco flavor is totally subliminated that still smell like I am smoking a Marb.. Those I wouldn't consider an aromatic at all(they don't smell good). There are some very lightly topped blends, where the topping doesn't come through in the flavor much but is very prominent in the room note.. that is an Aro to me. There are gradations of this in both directions, but I tend to stick to the definition of the word and not the industry.
i tend to tilt toward the room note side of the equation when calling a tobacco aromatic. After all, that's what the word means.
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Ruffinogold
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Mon Nov 26, 2018 11:12 am

Purists are a drag . They mess up the whole common definition of aromatic . Being they don't care for them , I wish they d stay out of aromatic conversations:) ... that said , an aromatic is pretty well flavored blend . Imho , sutliff is the master at flavoring , they really are . Geerally speaking , aromatics are usually cavendish though there are exceptions for sure ... like say PSLTF, which is awesome btw
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Longshanks
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Mon Nov 26, 2018 12:04 pm

I keep it generic and don't pay much attention to what's in it. Rather, in layman's terms:
A) if it smells sweet and edible, I call it Aromatic.
B) if it smells like an old fireplace, a campfire or barbecue sauce, I call it English.
C) if it doesn't fall into A or B definitions, I just call it by name.
8-)
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Whalehead King
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Tue Nov 27, 2018 5:29 pm

Ruffinogold wrote:
Mon Nov 26, 2018 11:12 am
Purists are a drag .
You nailed it, brother.



Aros are rock and roll.
I run a small hotel in New Orleans. It's in Louisiana, in case you're thinking of another New Orleans I've never heard of.
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